Serving Edmonton’s Immigrant Communities

Edmonton is increasingly becoming a destination city for immigrants entering Canada. In 2011, 20.5% of the population in Edmonton were immigrants. Based off a recently published report by Statistics Canada, that number is estimated to rise to 31.7% by 2036. As a result, efficient and effective integration of incoming immigrants and refugees is a crucial priority for Edmonton. Luckily, there are a number of organizations, private and public, whose mission is to help newcomers to Edmonton find their place in their new home.

Alberta and City of Edmonton Services
Both the City and the Provincial governments host centres specifically catered towards orienting and providing information services for newcomers to Edmonton. The Citizen and New Arrival Information Centre, located at City hall, offers information on and assistance in accessing the City’s services in over 150 languages. Simultaneously, the province runs 4 separate Alberta Supports centres across the city. Similar to the New Arrival Information Centre, Alberta Supports connect newcomers with essential services ranging from the International Qualifications Assessment to Alberta’s Child and Health Care services.

Edmonton Immigrant Services Association
For over 30 years, the Edmonton Immigrant Services Association (EISA) has been providing a variety of programs for newcomers to Edmonton. These include their “English as Another Language” classes, the In-School Settlement Services program, the New Neighbors program, and general translation and interpretation services. The EISA places a focus on helping newcomers access existing services and learn about Canadian customs and expectations. Their service helps immigrants with everything from finding and applying to jobs, to obtaining a driver’s license, to just finding some new people to interact and make friends with.

Catholic Social Services
Catholic Social Services (CSS) is the pre-eminent Catholic charity in Edmonton and works to provide a number of services for immigrants in the city. Their primary services focus on settlement and orientation, helping newcomers understand the process of acquiring citizenship, employment, and generally how to integrate with their new communities. CSS also runs the Language Assessment, Referral & Counselling Centre, which runs the officially recognized Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada (LINC) and Language and Vocational Assessment (LVA) programs.

ASSIST Community Services Centre
ASSIST is another long-running immigrant support centre, having operated in Edmonton for 40 years. Having expanded from its roots in the Chinese community, ASSIST now provides orientation, legal and mental health counselling, aid with employment, and LINC classes. ASSIST is remarkable for providing services in 12 languages: Arabic, English, German, Gujarati, Hindi, Korean, Mandarin, Kakwa, Punjabi, Russian, Tagalog and Urdu.

Changing Together: A Centre for Immigrant Women
The Changing Together agency is specifically focused on helping immigrant women. They provide a variety of self-improvement services, including ESL classes, basic computer courses, employment counselling and support, and family support services. Edmonton has the dubious honor of having the third highest unemployment rate for women in Canada, with a correspondingly large gap between women and men’s unemployment rates (8.6% to 5.9%) and average wage (women make $0.59 for every dollar made by men).

Multicultural Health Brokers Co-op and the Multicultural Family Resource Society
These two sister groups focus on bringing multicultural communities together to solve the isolation and lack of support in immigrant communities. Multicultural Health Brokers Co-op began as a response to research indicating immigrant mothers were having difficulty with pre-natal healthcare. The organization trained women in those communities as “brokers” to provide pre-natal health care education in the languages and formats amenable to immigrant mothers. Since then the organization has grown to address senior and youth health concerns, and to generally provide a holistic health service for Edmonton communities. The Multicultural Family Resource Society was built on a similar foundation, but targeted at providing social programs and discussions for families from different cultures. They run programs and consultation groups focusing on multicultural parents, immigrant youth, and on English classes that specifically involve youth in the classroom.

ESPC logoBy Maxwell Jenkins, Research Support Assistant
Edmonton Social Planning Council


Sources:
Morency, J-D., Malenfant, E, C., MacIsaac, S. (2017) Immigration and Diversity: Population Projections for Canada and its Regions, 2011 to 2036. Statistics Canada. Retrieved from: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/91-551-x/91-551-x2017001-eng.htm
City of Edmonton. (2017) New Resident Programs. Retrieved from: https://www.edmonton.ca/programs_services/programs-new-resident.aspx
Alberta Government. Alberta Support Centres. Retrieved from: https://www.alberta.ca/alberta-supports.aspx
Edmonton Immigrant Services Association. (2017) About Us. Retrieved from: http://www.eisa-edmonton.org/
Edmonton Immigrant Services Association. (2017) Services & Programs. Retrieved from: http://www.eisa-edmonton.org/
Catholic Social Services. (2017) Our Ministries, Immigrant & Refugee Support. Retrieved from: https://www.cssalberta.ca/Our-Ministries/Immigrant-Refugee-Support
ASSIST Community Services Centre. (2017) About Us. Retrieved from: http://assistcsc.org/en/
ASSIST Community Services Centre. (2017) Immigrant Services. Retrieved from: http://assistcsc.org/en/
Changing Together: A Centre for Immigrant Women. (2017) Services. Retrieved from: http://www.changingtogether.com/index.html
Statistics Canada. (2017). Labour Force survey estimates (LFS), by census metropolitan area based on 2011 Census boundaries, sex and age group, annual. CANSIM Table 2820-0129.
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (2016). The Best and Worst Places to be a Woman in Canada 2016 – the Gender Gap in Canada’s 25 Biggest Cities. Retrieved from https://www.policyalternatives.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/publications/National%20Office/2016/10/Best_and_Worst_Places_to_Be_a_Woman2016.pdf
Multicultural Health Brokers Co-op. (2017) Our History. Retrieved from: http://mchb.org/
Multicultural Health Brokers Co-op. (2017) Programs and Services. Retrieved from: http://mchb.org/
Multicultural Family Resource Society. (2017) About Us. Retrieved from: https://www.mfrsedmonton.org/
Multicultural Family Resource Society. (2017) What We Do. Retrieved from: https://www.mfrsedmonton.org/

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