A Journey Together in Grief, Healing and Hope – July 6, 2017

This year the World Indigenous Games are coming to Edmonton on July 2-9, 2017. To align with this event, Edmonton’s Interfaith Housing Initiative and End Poverty, along with partners from the aboriginal community are organizing a gathering with faith leaders, new immigrant community leaders, and members of the aboriginal community. We hope to build bridges for understanding, hope and healthy relationship for our journey together on Turtle Island (North America).

The gathering will take place at: Edmonton Native Healing Centre; 101-11813 123 street.  The event begins at 9:00 am on Thursday, July 6, 2017 and continues until lunch is concluded (around 1:30pm)

Our plan is as follows

1. We will begin with a smudge ceremony/prayer
2. then participate in a blanket exercise; which is a way to experience the major changes in North American History from an aboriginal perspective.
3. We will then move into a talking circle, where we will make space to grieve together, and move toward hope and healing.
4. Afterwards, we will share a meal together (provided).

 

As space is limited to a maximum of forty participants, please respond early in order to ensure you are able to participate.

Send your RSVP to the following email addresses, and indicate any food preferences:
mike@interfaithhousing.ca (Interfaith Housing Initiative)
sam.singh@edmonton.ca (End Poverty Edmonton)

 

On behalf of CRIHI and End Poverty,

Michael Van Boom

Capital Region Interfaith Housing Initiative

interfaithhousing.ca

 

crihi-logo-full  EndPovertyEDM_2C

 

Brander Gardens ROCKS!

…and so do the many partners (including local faith communities) who have come together to make it possible!

    Going to school in a more affluent neighbourhood can be a tough challenge for kids who are from low income families or are new to Canada.  They watch their classmates regularly head off to Mexico for vacations.  Opportunities like music lessons or getting onto higher level sports teams can be out of reach as their families need to invest far greater energy into paying the bills and keeping food on the table; along with confronting a host of other barriers like language and cultural literacy.  The opportunities for these kids just aren’t the same.

That’s where a program like BG Rocks comes in; a grass root organization involving many of the families living in the Brander Gardens housing complex operated by Capital Region Housing Corporation (CRHC).  This program offers help, opportunity and builds community far beyond what CRHC is able to provide.  It is the community’s involvement in the program that contributes to the success.  The organization leads away from ‘Us versus Them’ thinking to one of working together in the community.

Brander Garden ROCKS offers after school programs, a music school, community gardens, community meals, Mom and Tot programs, summer programs including camping, academic programs, and adult enrichment programs (including community involvement with WECAN food basket, make tax time pay, art enrichment, providing help with English and opportunities to volunteer right in their community).

What really makes something like this succeed is the strong circle of support they have received from neighbourhood partners. There are nearly thirty collaborative partners such as local schools, community leagues and libraries that have partnered with Brander Gardens ROCKS.  Organizations like Sports Central, KidSport and the local Terwillegar Riverbend Soccer Association support nearly thirty youth each year to participate in the soccer program.  The Community league pays for the use of the Gym at the Junior High and offers space for the Mom and Tots program.  The Terwillegar Riverbend Advisory Council helps by hosting information on their website and is their fiscal partner. The financial support of REACH and the City of Edmonton, and Canada Summer Jobs make this a broad community effort!

One key partner for BG Rocks is the Riverbend United Church.  RUC has a long-term commitment to the local neighbourhood, and that brought them to the table right at the beginning.  The church was quick to open their doors, and became one of the key facilities used by kids and families in the program.  They provide a free room for teaching, which currently hosts a family literacy course.  RUC also began hosting a community meal every year, inviting the broad community including some Syrian families.  BG Rocks families are invited to help do the shopping and cook the meal with the RUC volunteers, and this shared effort makes for a wonderful and special event.  According to the coordinator Sharon Gritter, when she needs volunteers, Riverbend United Church is one of the first groups she approaches.

BG Rocks dinner painting
In the photo above: Volunteers from Riverbend United Church and youth and families from BG ROCKS together paint tiles for the national Canada 150 mosaic; which aims to win a place in the Guiness Book of World Records!

What does success look like?
‘Kids are being mentored!’  Sharon says, ‘When a kid you have been working hard with (and challenging) crosses the finish line at the end of a long race, it is really moving.’  Because of their sports programs they are seeing kids make it onto the local Junior High teams.  They get to do fun things like go camping, and go on field trips.  It strengthens and enriches the lives of the kids and families, and it connects them in a supportive community.   BG ROCKS! is a great example of what a local community can do to ensure all their neighbours have a chance to flourish!

By: Mike Van Boom, based on an interview with BG Rocks director, Sharon Gritter

Martina’s Story

In October of 2016, Martina (once a teen parent needing help) shared her story at a workshop CRIHI hosted in the Riverbend/Terwillegar community. 

“Thank you to [CRIHI] for inviting me to share some of my personal experiences and thoughts related to safe and affordable housing.  I hope I can give voice to the thousands of Edmontonians who seek safe and affordable housing.”

My name is Martina Crory.  I am 23 years old, a mother to my adorable 3-year-old son Jude, a third-year university student at MacEwan, and I was recently accepted into the honours program in political science.

I grew up living with my mom.  She had few marketable skills and as a result we moved from Halifax to Edmonton hoping for more opportunities.  Unfortunately, those hopes never came to be.  We continued to live in poverty with little income and limited housing options.  We moved around a lot and it never really felt like I had a home.  As a young person growing up, it was chaotic and disruptive.  Every time I moved I would have to leave some things behind or things would get lost moving.  It was not a very stable way for a teenager to grow up.

When you don’t have stable housing, your life is not stable.  At nineteen years, old I found myself pregnant; a single parent.  If things were tough, I knew they were going to be tougher.  I reached out to the Terra Centre for teen parents, and for the past three years they have been by my side providing support in so many ways.

My son Jude and I ended up living in a walk up off 107 Ave.  My laundry would get stolen, there was always the smell of pot in the building.  It was noisy, and there was nowhere for kids to play outside.  This is not what I wanted for Jude.  I knew the risks of these environments.  I looked around for a better safe place for us to live, but the rents were beyond my reach.

Although that was a challenge, what seemed even more challenging in finding decent safe and affordable housing were the assumptions and judgements that I faced as a young single parent.  Landlords and the general public did not see me as a young parent with potential and capabilities; they saw me as a reckless, irresponsible and inadequate mom; nothing further than the truth.

It was a difficult time.  I applied for subsidized housing with Capital Region Housing, but with a two-year wait list I felt so defeated.  Terra had just started a new housing partnership with Brentwood Family Housing Society and I was accepted.

When I first went to see what was to be my new home, I was speechless.  It was in a quiet community with other families.  It had playgrounds, and my townhouse had a washer and dryer.  This was like a dream come true for me.  When I moved in, it was the first time I could remember that it felt like it was home.  Because of the subsidy, Brentwood offers, it was affordable, based on my student income.  I started to feel like there was hope.  I started to believe I could pursue my dreams of graduating from University.  For the past two years, I have been living in safe and affordable housing.  Because of that, I have been able to make great gains in reaching my goals.

I am proud of my academic accomplishments, of raising a well-adjusted, happy and healthy child.  I feel like I am part of the community and I am getting ahead.  I am even the proud owner of a ‘mom car.’  I can afford it because of subsidized rent.  It may not look pretty, but if I need to take Jude to the hospital at 2:00am I can do that.  I can drive him to his skating lessons.  I can spend more quality time with him; saving more than two hours a day from riding the bus; time I can spend with him.

Affordable housing gives me security and options.  I don’t have to choose between rent and good food for Jude.  We never owned a home growing up, or had much stable housing.  I think life would have been much different if we had.  I dream of owning my own home one day, and I know pursuing my educational goals will help me to achieve that.  Having affordable housing today is helping me to reach that goal.  I know that subsidized housing will not always be necessary; but I am grateful that I have been able to benefit from it.

As you spend time today listing about affordable housing and the people who need this support, please consider the following:

  1. People who need affordable housing have goals; I don’t think most want to have a subsidy.
  2. We want to give our kids a home and provide them with stability and opportunity.
  3. If you have children, what we want for our children is no different than what you want for your children.
  4. We want to give back, not just take; affordable housing can help make that happen.
  5. We need more people to care about our community; what kind of community are we cultivating for our children and what we can teach our children about inclusion.

Thank you for taking the time for this discussion today and caring about our community.